Research

Getting reflexive: Reflections from a data loving researcher

By Rebecca Musgrove I’ve always loved numbers. I have vivid memories of the excitement of solving complicated A-level maths problems. I enjoyed the lack of ambiguity; either the answer was right or it was wrong. It was knowable. Twenty years later, via a career implementing community health projects, where there is rarely one straightforward solution,… Continue reading Getting reflexive: Reflections from a data loving researcher

Research

Using single-item measures in suicide and self-harm research

By Rosie Pendrous. In psychological research, we rely on being able to measure a construct (such as depression) or a behaviour (such as frequency of past self-harm) in a valid and reliable way [1]. In doing so, we need to balance developing measures that accurately tap into the construct or behaviour we intend to measure… Continue reading Using single-item measures in suicide and self-harm research

Research

Highlighting measurement challenges in suicide research

By Erik Reinbergs. Measuring complex constructs related to suicide (i.e., suicidal ideation, planning, behaviors, intent, attempts, etc.) is extremely challenging. Many of these terms lack agreed upon definitions and are frequently used imprecisely, making accurate measurement difficult in even the best designed studies [1]. Without accurate measurement, however, the validity of psychological research is severely… Continue reading Highlighting measurement challenges in suicide research

Events

A Year in Review: netECR 2019

Longer nights are drawing in, city centres are twinkling with holiday lights and faculty are donning winter jumpers: winter is firmly on its way and Christmas is just around the corner (…and we are writing from the northern hemisphere!). With the winter break fast approaching, and netECR members preparing for a well-deserved holiday, we thought… Continue reading A Year in Review: netECR 2019

Suicide Prevention

Community pharmacy: An untapped resource in suicide prevention?

By Hayley Gorton Back in 2015, I attended the International Association for Suicide Prevention congress the first time. I found myself in a room with about 600 delegates including psychiatrists, psychologists, statisticians, epidemiologists and many others; but realised that I was probably the only pharmacist there. This made me reflect on my own practice as… Continue reading Community pharmacy: An untapped resource in suicide prevention?

Research

How smartphones can revolutionise suicide research

By Wouter van Ballegooijen Everyone has a smartphone. Well no, but 80% of people do (in the UK and the Netherlands) and it’s safe to say that your average patient in adult and adolescent mental health care will have one. I recently calculated that each of my two-year-old smartphone’s 8 processor cores have 15 times… Continue reading How smartphones can revolutionise suicide research

Research

Out of the lab and into everyday life: Using Experience Sampling Methods to better understand self-harm and suicide

By Olivia Kirtley The lab and questionnaire-based nature of much self-harm and suicide research means that we often only have access to snapshots of participants’ experiences and behaviours. Furthermore, the chronic lack of prospective and longitudinal research in the field means we know very little about how behaviours and experiences change over time. Most often,… Continue reading Out of the lab and into everyday life: Using Experience Sampling Methods to better understand self-harm and suicide

Lived Experience

When your research topic becomes too close to home

By Laura Hemming It was an average Sunday afternoon when me and my partner, Sam, decided to head to our local swimming pool for a few laps. We’d been particularly stressed due to being midway through searching for and purchasing our first home, and decided we’d take some time out of relentlessly scrolling Rightmove to… Continue reading When your research topic becomes too close to home

Research

Experiences of online recruitment for suicide research: Some best practice recommendations

By Rosie Pendrous Recruiting people into psychological studies can be challenging, especially in an area as sensitive as suicide/self-harm.  Researchers are increasingly turning to the internet to recruit people based on the popularity and accessibility of social media. Social media is now widely accessed by the general population, with approximately 89% of UK adults accessing the… Continue reading Experiences of online recruitment for suicide research: Some best practice recommendations

Research

The need for a “Psychological Science Accelerator” in suicide research

By Austin J. Gallyer The Problem Suicide is an international public health crisis. In the United States (U.S.), the suicide rate increased by 33% from 1999 to 2017 [1], and in Scotland, the suicide rate increased by about 15% from 2017 to 2018 [2]. Because of this large public health burden, scientists have conducted research… Continue reading The need for a “Psychological Science Accelerator” in suicide research

Suicide Prevention

3 things we should know about suicide in autistic adults

By Mirabel Pelton My research asks why autistic people* [A] are more likely to engage in suicidal thoughts and behaviours than people who aren’t autistic. I want to produce evidence that will really reduce suicide rates. As I near the end of my second year as a PhD student, I’ve noticed that, when I introduce… Continue reading 3 things we should know about suicide in autistic adults

Interviews

Interview: Career advice from Siobhan O’Neill

Siobhan O’Neill is a Professor of Mental Health Sciences at Ulster University. Her current research programmes focus on trauma and suicidal behaviour in Northern Ireland, novel interventions for mental health and suicidal behaviour. Siobhan has expertise in qualitative and quantitative (epidemiology and survey) research methods. What are your main research interests? I am really interested… Continue reading Interview: Career advice from Siobhan O’Neill

Events

Reflections on the 4th Early and Mid-Career Researchers’ Forum, Glasgow, 2019

By Hilary Causer I arrived in Glasgow with rain lashing against the windows of the train, a familiar knot of worry in my chest and google maps open on my phone. This was my first visit to the city and my first EMCRF. It offered the opportunity to meet a whole host of people who… Continue reading Reflections on the 4th Early and Mid-Career Researchers’ Forum, Glasgow, 2019

Events

Conference Review: 4th Suicide and Self-harm Early and Mid-Career Researchers’ Forum

By James Jopling, Executive Director for Samaritans Scotland. I must admit, I arrived at the 4th Suicide and Self-Harm Early and Mid-Career Researchers Forum in Glasgow with some trepidation. Although I have worked for Samaritans for nearly four years, this was my first meaningful foray into the world of suicide and self-harm research. Many of… Continue reading Conference Review: 4th Suicide and Self-harm Early and Mid-Career Researchers’ Forum

Academia

Lessons learnt in the quest for meaningful and effective patient and public involvement

By Donna Littlewood  Today I am giving a talk on Patient and Public involvement at the Suicide and Self-Harm Early and Mid-Career Researchers’ Forum (#EMCRF19) in Glasgow. This blog is the virtual version of that talk - but with links to relevant resources and a few added extras that I could not include in the… Continue reading Lessons learnt in the quest for meaningful and effective patient and public involvement

Suicide Prevention

International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia, Interphobia and Transphobia (IDAHOBIT)

By Hazel Marzetti Today is the International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia, Interphobia and Transphobia (IDAHOBIT). IDAHOBIT happens every year on the 17th of May and provides an opportunity for people (LGBTI people and our allies) who feel able, to stand visibly against discrimination and harassment faced by LGBTI people. Does that really happen anymore? One… Continue reading International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia, Interphobia and Transphobia (IDAHOBIT)

Opportunities

Cognitive Approaches to Combatting Suicidality: Research Assistant Psychologist

Agenda for Change Band 4 Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust Research and Development Directorate, is looking to appoint a 1.0 WTE (5 days per week) Research Assistant  to work on an MRC/NIHR Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation funded project (the CARMS trial: Cognitive AppRoaches to coMbatting Suicidality). This study will investigate psychological mechanisms underlying… Continue reading Cognitive Approaches to Combatting Suicidality: Research Assistant Psychologist

Events

2nd netECR Brunch

When launched in September 2017, one of the main aims of netECR was to encourage networking and collaboration between PhDs/ECRs in suicide and self-harm research internationally. Today, the community is comprised of ECRs from many different labs and institutions across the globe. To strengthen the connections made online, and provide an opportunity for others to… Continue reading 2nd netECR Brunch

Journal Club Notes

Machine learning in suicide science: Applications and ethics

On Monday, 4th February at 12pm (GMT) we had our first monthly online journal club session of 2019 and we discussed the paper “Machine learning in suicide science: Applications and ethics” by Ryn Linthicum and colleagues. Here are some notes from thoughts shared in our discussion, kindly summarised by Ian Hussey. Overview of paper Machine… Continue reading Machine learning in suicide science: Applications and ethics

Research, Uncategorized

The value of qualitative research methods in suicide prevention/suicidal behaviour research

By Isabela Troya. Suicide and suicidal behaviour are complex and multifactorial, influenced by a range of different determinants. Despite the complexity of suicidal behaviour, the approach taken within the field of suicidology in research has been mostly dominated by a single research design: quantitative methods. Hjelmeland and Knizek [1] have already documented the lack of… Continue reading The value of qualitative research methods in suicide prevention/suicidal behaviour research