Research

The balancing act: Empowerment and agency versus protection and safety – Reflecting on the requirement for active parental consent in suicide research with young people

By Sadhbh Byrne The ethical considerations of suicide research with young people are aptly-described ‘thorny’, not least because young people are, by default, considered a vulnerable population. Although the concept of ‘vulnerability’ in this context is socially constructed [1], [2], and therefore difficult to precisely define, it appears that this is due to the confluence… Continue reading The balancing act: Empowerment and agency versus protection and safety – Reflecting on the requirement for active parental consent in suicide research with young people

Journal Club Notes

“These Things Don’t Work.” Young People’s Views on Harm Minimization Strategies as a Proxy for Self Harm

On Wednesday, 28th August 2019 we had our monthly online journal club session and we discussed the paper “These Things Don’t Work.” Young People’s Views on Harm Minimization Strategies as a Proxy for Self-Harm: A Mixed Methods Approachethics” by Ruth Wadman, Emma Nielsen, Linda O’Raw, Katherine Brown, A. Jess Williams, Kapil Sayal & Ellen Townsend.… Continue reading “These Things Don’t Work.” Young People’s Views on Harm Minimization Strategies as a Proxy for Self Harm

Journal Club Notes

Machine learning in suicide science: Applications and ethics

On Monday, 4th February at 12pm (GMT) we had our first monthly online journal club session of 2019 and we discussed the paper “Machine learning in suicide science: Applications and ethics” by Ryn Linthicum and colleagues. Here are some notes from thoughts shared in our discussion, kindly summarised by Ian Hussey. Overview of paper Machine… Continue reading Machine learning in suicide science: Applications and ethics