Research

Rethinking outcomes in self-harm research

The effectiveness of an intervention is typically determined by the use of outcome measures, whether this be in research or in clinical practice. In research, outcomes allow for the determination of an intervention’s suitability for wider distribution into communities. In clinical practice, outcomes can contribute to practitioners’ understanding of service users’ wellbeing and whether it has improved or if extra support is required. Clearly, outcome measures can carry a lot of weight, so it is important that the target constructs are meaningful and relevant so that they accurately reflect the experience of ‘recovery’ for each individual.

Lived Experience

See What I’m Saying? Using creative methods to open up conversations around self-harm, suicide and ‘recovery’

By Emma Nielsen and Donna Littlewood They say that a picture speaks a thousand words. While a thousand is arguably a point of debate, it is certainly true that images can be a powerful means of conveying ideas, sharing experiences and opening up conversations. This can be particularly important when words are hard to find… Continue reading See What I’m Saying? Using creative methods to open up conversations around self-harm, suicide and ‘recovery’