ECRs

Erik Reinbergs

Institution: Cypress-Fairbanks Independent School District, United States. Position: Postdoctoral Fellow. Current research: My work is based on improving the quality of school-based mental health services and the uptake of evidence-based practices in public schools – through both clinical and public health approaches. I’m especially passionate about suicide prevention, assessment, and intervention practices with adolescents and… Continue reading Erik Reinbergs

Opportunities

Research Associate for PSTRC Greater Manchester -Mental Health Services

The NIHR Patient Safety Translational Research Centre Greater Manchester seeks a full-time Research Associate for a fixed term contract, starting from 1st September 2019 until 31 July 2022. Funding is available to undertake this post on a full-time basis, but job-share or part-time working applications would be welcome. This post will be appointed in the… Continue reading Research Associate for PSTRC Greater Manchester -Mental Health Services

Research

Do Harm Minimisation Techniques Really Help Young People Who Self-harm?

By Katherine Brown Harm minimisation and self-harm ‘Harm minimisation’ approaches aim to reduce the damage that happens when someone engages in behaviour that could negatively affect their health [1]. Although the approach has its origins in the field of substance misuse [2], it has since been used in other areas - including the treatment of… Continue reading Do Harm Minimisation Techniques Really Help Young People Who Self-harm?

ECRs

Kealagh Robinson

Institution: Victoria University Wellington (Youth Wellbeing Study, and the Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience Lab, School of Psychology), New Zealand. Supervisory team: Professor Marc Wilson and Associate Professor Gina Grimshaw. Position: PhD Student. Current research: I am interested in how people experience and regulate their emotions, and especially in how these processes relate to wellbeing. My… Continue reading Kealagh Robinson

Lived Experience

What’s okay to say? The acceptability of language used to talk about suicide

By Emma Nielsen Language: the source of much debate Talking matters; we want people to be having helpful, open and compassionate conversations about suicide. A central aspect of supporting this is developing a comprehensive, clear and evidence-based understanding of what language people find acceptable, and what is not acceptable, when doing the talking. Here, it… Continue reading What’s okay to say? The acceptability of language used to talk about suicide